The Rabbani Effect: Afghanistan’s New Generation of Resistance


If you’re not too familiar with politics in Afghanistan and you happen to have never heard of the name ‘Rabbani’, this is probably not the article you should read to become acquainted with the name. However, if you’ve heard of an elderly man named Burhanuddin Rabbani, then I’m happy to tell you that this blog is written by someone closely related to him.

Exactly five years ago, I witnessed what – to date – was the worst day of my life. They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. In my case, witnessing the assassination of my father by a cowardly suicide bomber didn’t kill me, but it definitely killed a part of me and made me fierce, intense, focused, and appreciative of everything I have in life – opening my eyes to personal strengths and potential I would otherwise have never known.

Five years ago, communist remnants and leftist Afghans would have celebrated what they thought would be the end of an era of someone they worked their entire lives against during the communist days of Afghanistan’s bloody history. Fast forward five years on and the name Rabbani has sunk in deeper in Afghanistan’s politics than ever before. Today, not only is the first generation of Rabbani seen actively engaged in the current political scene but so have the second generation of Rabbani started working and paving way for their political careers. Not to mention there’s more members that will be making their mark when the time is right.

I have been writing blogs on Afghanistan in English challenging the established attitudes and mindset enforced by the international media and army of journalists who refuse to look at Afghanistan’s issues beyond the past two decades, or refuse to accept work opposed to their self-fulfilling prophecies – all the while, supposedly, promoting freedom of speech and expression in Afghanistan.

The Rabbani connection today is also a diversified one. There’s family members that have decided to start philanthropic work and on a personal level, I have been writing blogs on Afghanistan in English challenging the established attitudes and mindset enforced by the international media and army of journalists who refuse to look at Afghanistan’s issues beyond the past two decades, or refuse to accept work opposed to their self-fulfilling prophecies – all the while, supposedly, promoting freedom of speech and expression in Afghanistan.

Today, the world is able to see Rabbani from different, albeit at times contradictory, dimensions. Since I went public with promoting my music on social media through the hashtag #EDMA (Electronic Dance Music Afghanistan), I’m constantly reminded of the challenges even the most liberal of Rabbani family members will face. But I’m not the one to be slowed down by bitter criticism of what I do. If anything, I’ve used the critics as my main motivators to help me keep doing what I’m doing with more passion and might year after year. 

One of my best friends once said to me that, “your father may have passed away but he has left a fire burning inside you”

After the darkness must come light and perhaps that’s why I’m also reminded of the huge amount of support I get from younger generations of Afghanistan – that’s always a great reason to think of creative ways in promoting Afghanistan through my music and opinionated articles. One of my best friends once said to me that, “your father may have passed away but he has left a fire burning inside you”. I’m happy to see that my passion for everything I do in life and my burning desire to make something useful out of my life in my own right through hard work is strong enough that at times, it’s almost visible to people that are close to me.

As I write this blog, I happen to be in the capital city of India in New Delhi, the same city that is home to the family of Afghanistan’s last communist leader who was brutally battered and hung in public in a Gaddafi-style killing by the Taliban – one of the most extremist and brutal Islamic regimes in recent history of the world. This is also a stark reminder to me that Afghanistan must not return to extremism in liberal or conservative form, and that a balance of both as a middle ground should be given an opportunity to flourish. This is where we – the new generation of resistance – come in.

Five years ago, Tuesday the 20th of September 2011 may have the worst day of my life but today, I look back and celebrate the exponential growth in strength and support from the Afghan public for my family. I am forever indebted to the ongoing support from each and every young person that has entrusted us by putting their support behind my brother Salahuddin Rabbani and helping him in his position as the Foreign Minister in a loose Government which I’m highly critical of. I’m also grateful to every single person I’ve come across through social media that have helped protect me from unfair criticism, personal attacks, and attempts by rogue elements to sabotage my online presence – I’ve been fortunate to meet some of these wonderful people and look forward to seeing others in person over the coming years.

I can’t speak for other members of the Rabbani family but I can assure the readers that I have a lot more in mind beyond #EDMA in the coming years. As for the cynics and haters, you have the choice of supporting me as a fellow Afghan doing something different, something new to promote Afghanistan in a positive light; however, if you choose to stand in my way or against me, I wish you the best of luck!

For more information go to:

Official Shuja Rabbani Website: http://www.shujarabbani.com

Official Shuja Rabbani Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shujarabbani/

Official Shuja Rabbani Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShujaRabbani

Official Shuja Rabbani Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ShujaRabbaniPage

Official Shuja Rabbani SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/shuja-rabbani

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s